Reformation Poem

Monday, October 30, 2017


Five hundred years ago tomorrow, Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, shown in the picture. I wrote a modest poem to celebrate this momentous event. There are a few inaccuracies (yes, I know that the catechism and the 95 theses are not the same) and some near rhymes, but that’s the beauty of poetic license. If you call me a heretic, I’m in good company. Isn’t that so, Martin?

In fifteen thousand and seventeen,
Luther crossed the village green.
He had no thought of vandalism
As he nailed up his catechism.


The 95 theses attached to a door
Were statements the Pope was bound to abhor.
Who was this upstart who fought with tradition
Using the Word as his only weapon?


As Luther preached salvation by grace,
He was put on trial to plead his case.
But though he sought to reform with reason,
The Pope and the Emperor both cried “Treason.”


Martin Luther’s plight looked grim
When the Pope excommunicated him.
And to Luther’s firm words, “Here I stand,”
The Emperor responded, “Banned!”


Five hundred years have come and gone
And Luther’s writings still live on.
So as we celebrate Reformation
Remember his message of salvation.


Saved by grace.
__________

The poem is © 2017 by Kathryn Page Camp, and the photo is © 2016 by Kathryn Page Camp.

1 comment:

Gordon Stamper said...

Great commemorative poem, Kathryn!

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